Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD)

Project:      http://lead.csusb.edu/

Theme: Overall Portrait

 

1) With all the problems that we are facing in this country at the moment: the economy, the environment, the politics of immigration, — the Latino community adds yet another quandary to our list. As an educational community, we are in the middle of an educational crisis.

- While Latinos have emerged as the largest minority in the U.S. (the new census indicates that now we are 1 in 6 persons), and Latino children form the largest demographic group in many of our public schools (1 in 4 children), our educational attainment is not keeping pace.

 

• A significant quantity (perhaps as high as 70 %) of Latino children does not have access to pre-K (the preschool programs).

• And once in school, from start, there is that mismatch between the school and home.

• Then, our children attend schools with fewer resources (in terms of the available programs, the funds and faculty …);

• Have a high mobility rate, are located in racially segregated communities with high poverty rates;

•Score among the lowest on achievement tests;

•Continue to have some of the highest dropout rates (push out rates);

• A third, and as high up to a half, in general throughout the country, they do not graduate from “high school”.

• the average Latino high school-er that does graduate has but the skill-level of an eighth grader.

• And barely half of those who do graduate, for example in California (scarcely 25%) meet the requirements so that they can be admitted to the university.

• Most Latino high school graduates enroll in the community college system.

• – but then transfer rates are very low. In IE, only 2 out of 10 who start off with the intention, actually transfer to a 4-year university.

• So therefore we have low college enrollment and graduation rates.

 

2) Education is of economic imperative, and the Civil Rights issue of our generation; it’s a right not a privilege.

- For the purpose of broader context: the competitive strength of the U.S. in a global economy depends, and will continue to depend to a large extent, on the positive educational outcomes of Latino students at all levels.

As we represent a significant portion of this country's future strength, we must achieve a dramatic and powerful change in our communities. For the U.S. to create a positive future it will require a Latino citizenry that is:

•Equipped to compete in a global economy;

•Part of a literate and well-educated labor and consumer base;

•A pool of linguistic and cultural talent that would serve to strengthen ties with Mexico and Latin America;

•Significant component of a highly productive work and business force that contributes to the tax base and therefore the economic well-being of the U.S.;

•Poised to participate and shape the U.S. political landscape through voting and civic engagement

 

3) The current stage is, of course, the discourse of "neoliberalism", or a discourse in which unregulated or "free" markets operated by entrepreneurial individuals are regarded as the optimal solution not only to economic, but also to social and political problems. This framework structures ideas about and the goals set for community development, definitions of the public good, and definitions of citizenship that create wider distinctions than before between the "deserving" or "super-" citizen, and the undeserving or "sub-" citizen.

 

- Now, higher education institutions are criticized –often for good reason- for their tendency to isolate themselves from their surrounding contexts and for not being more engaged with the issues that affect the communities in which they are located.

- And the LEAD organization agrees that there are important issues that directly or indirectly affect institutions and their communities that require higher education faculty, staff and students to “get out of the ivory tower,” to do the work that is highly relevant for the local context and to employ findings in such a way that they can be used to foster discussions that help inform policymakers.

 

Extra comments:

- Even when Latino EL students enter college, they often must enroll in remedial courses and struggle to achieve full literacy and academic success.
It is not surprising, then, that according to a recent _Pew Hispanic Center survey_ (http://pewhispanic.org/files/factsheets/68.pdf) , two-thirds of Latinos report that discrimination against Latinos
in schools is a major social problem.
- Latinos mention schools more often than workplaces or other public places as sites of discrimination.
A _Pew Research Center survey _ (http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2010/01/12/blacks-upbeat-about-black-progress-
prospects/) suggests that Americans from all racial and ethnic groups currently believe that Latinos are the group that experiences
the most social discrimination. Unfortunately, much research has shown that, as it has for African Americans, such discrimination can
negatively affect Latinos’ academic achievement, engagement, and sense of belonging in K–12 and higher education.
- Although the number of Latino students in US higher education has increased in recent decades, and Latinos have now surpassed African Americans as the
largest minority group in US higher education (currently constituting 22 percent of total enrollment), Latinos as a group still have the lowest educational attainment
of any racial or ethnic group.
- Latinos consequently tend to work in low-skill occupations. “This is not just a Latino problem, this is an American problem.”
Education scholars have documented the many barriers to postsecondary educational attainment for Latinos:
- limited academic preparation,
- difficulty navigating the college environment,
- financial concerns,
- exclusionary college climates.
- Latino college students tend to come from high schools with few resources to prepare students for college.
- Many are the first in their families to attend college, so they are sometimes unfamiliar with strategies for managing college responsibilities.
- Latino students also often are reluctant to take on loans, in part because of the financial and familial responsibilities they already have during college.
- They are more likely than other students to be employed and to work full time to finance their college education, so they may have less time to devote to their studies.
- The broader political climate can also make it difficult for Latino students to find a sense of belonging in their college communities.
- Vulnerability to stereotypes about Latinos, such as those that are increasingly depicted in the media, can have a negative effect on Latino students’ academic achievement in college
as well as their college completion rates.
- Improving the Campus Climate - Although Latinos constitute about one in six Americans and more than one-fifth of the undergraduate
students enrolled in US higher education, they make up less than 5 percent of the professoriate.
- Latino college students tend to complete bachelor’s degrees at lower rates than members of other racial and ethnic groups, leading to lower rates of graduate degree enrollment,
doctoral degree completion, and faculty employment.
- Latino faculty will continue to be largely invisible unless universities make concerted efforts to recruit and retain them.
- At least two decades of research on diversity in higher education indicate that increasing the presence of Latino faculty in higher education is critical to promoting Latino students’ educational attainment.
- Latino faculty understand the cultural backgrounds of Latino students and can serve as role models for them.
However, increasing the numbers of Latino faculty and students in the academy (as well as members of other historically underrepresented groups) is not enough to ensure their
success or build a community. Intentional efforts must also be made to maximize the benefits of diversity.
- Efforts to build a diverse faculty often focus on the recruitment of faculty members from historically underrepresented groups but underemphasize the importance of retaining and promoting them.

 

4) Project:                  http://lead.csusb.edu/AboutUs.htm

About Us

… who are we … and our purpose …

 

5) Project:                  http://lead.csusb.edu/Publications.htm

JLE

- More than a decade ago, with the birth of the Journal of Latinos and Education, the primary motivation was to build an education movement that was neither primarily ideational nor ideological, but a praxis based on scientific approaches. At the time there were still too few major publications on Latinos and Education. There were research reports published all over the place or in highly specialized books and journals. Further, there was no one comprehensive published review of theory, research and practice on the topic. Despite some seminal publications, Latino issues remained often seen as limited in focus (academic colonialism). Mainstream publications tended to consider Latino issues as peripheral to broader issues in the discipline. Mainstream publications also tended to focus on nationally known "Latino" authors and look only to the work of a few to publish.

- We changed that! Today the Journal of Latinos and Education (JLE) provides a cross-, multi-, and interdisciplinary forum for scholars and writers of diverse disciplines who share a common interest in the analysis, discussion, critique, and dissemination of educational issues that impact Latinos. With many thousands subscriptions, downloads and readers, our work informs a basis for current action to address the educational crisis, of which Latino students are emblematic.

 

6) Project:                  http://nlen.csusb.edu/

NLEN

- That momentum enacted the National Latino Education Network, whose electronic portal allowing for exchange among thousands, predated the cusp of the social media revolution. The netroots movement expanded among the broad spectrum of researchers, teaching professionals and educators, academics, scholars, administrators, independent writers and artists, policy and program specialists, students, parents, families, civic leaders, activists, and advocates. Among the primary action items was to compile a Resource Guide/Clearinghouse that allows members to search and browse for resources, opportunities and activities in the Latino Educational community, which was non-existent or incomplete at the time.  

 

7) Project:                  http://lead.csusb.edu/Publications.htm

HLE

- Next, the Handbook of Latinos and Education (HLE) had the unique purpose and function of profiling the scope and terrain of this particular domain. It remains the most significant and influential work in Latinos and Education, in terms of its contributions to research, to professional practice, and to the emergence of related interdisciplinary studies and theory. It symbolizes an important transition in Education, and the continual consciousness of Latinos. At core exists the struggle for educational equity and rights, with the conceptualization of social justice embedded, and support structure helping the plight of schools that are underfunded and racially organized in the most stereotypic of ways.

 

 

8) Project:                  http://lead.csusb.edu/Events.htm

LEAD Summit

- The LEAD Organization was organized to launch this handbook, and has already developed new and imaginative approaches, and action-oriented initiatives, as showcased in the annual Summit.

- Impact Numbers . . . http://lead.csusb.edu/ImpactNumbers.htm

17 million across 23 countries…

 

9) Project:              http://lead.csusb.edu/TasksThemesItems.htm

LEAD Tasks, Themes & Items

-In line with building upon the inaugural LEAD summit's goals, many participants at our second annual Summit, via online social media and our global virtual classroom, had ample opportunity to exchange and forge future action items. This process, which makes the LEAD Summit NOT a conference BUT an Action-Planning Forum, is one which will helps focus ideas and to decide what steps needed to take to achieve particular goals.

 

- Mention that this has gained considerable attention; WHI. – They have helped us shape the vision for our region.

 

1) Learn the traits, backgrounds, cultural histories, and diversity of- and among Latino groups.

2) Build teacher and counselor education programs which have an explicit student-home culture component so educators be not only sympathetic but appreciative and sensitive of students' backgrounds; and willing to structure the schooling experiences to be compatible with students.

3) Create qualified teachers that have specialized knowledge and skills in language acquisition, biliteracy, and cross-cultural learning. Build "grow your own" teacher recruitment and education programs, with candidates who have organic linkages to the communities in which they intend to serve.

4) Research the social reception received by Latino families and the impact of this on the learning of children.

5) Combat the deficit views of Latinos; incorporate students' language, culture, and experiential knowledge into schools; acknowldege that an educator's responsibility for providing students with particular academic content knowledge and learning skills should not conflict.

6) Create meaningful, trusting, horizontal and reciprocal relationships with Latino parents and extended family.

7) Short of a constitutional mandate for schooling at the Federal level, acknowledge that fundamentally, significant educational action is historically conducted at the level of States and our localities; thus, where much of our attentions should remain.

8) Draw together many diverse constituencies of vested interest and facilitate the growth or cluster of collaboratives or action zones that work together to meet educational targets for improvement. These include engagement among parents, students, and other concerned citizens into a movement of transnational proportions that will enable our voices to be heard in the public policy arena. These in turn foster creative learning and collaborative leadership projects among and within the action zones.

9) Maintain a basic ethos motivated by research, policy analysis and advocacy, education and community action. Foster the practice of research-based teaching and learning, and resist cooptation by political rhetoric, political parties, or unfunded governmental mandates.
10) Acknowledge that partnership-building is an action-based strategy, and that no responsible change comes without the public pressure that requires it.

11) Help empower Latino families with information and resources to succeed in the education system, thus fostering a strong culture in academic achievement and college aspiration.


La Feria Educativa

- sábado 1ero de octubre, de 9 am a 3 pm, en la Universidad Estatal de California en San Bernardino

- un acontecimiento comunitario diseñado para proporcionar estudiantes y sus familias con información y recursos que facilitarán rendimiento académico y su camino a la universidad.

El Tema – “El Poder de Saber”      -  con los Objetivos de:

1) Entusiasmar los jovenes acerca su camino al community college o universidad, y a una carrera professional.

2) Involucrar a los padres y las familias, y ofrecer oportunidades para entender su papel en el proceso.

 

3) Exhibir materiales de información pertinente al bienestar de la comunidad.

 

4) Generar un compromiso colectivo.

 

* el “Inland region” tenía el aumento más grande de Hispanos entre 2000 y 2010 de cualquier área metropolitana en los Estados Unidos

 

Oportunidades a participar en:

• Foros Comunitarios    • Exhibiciones, Vendedores y Expo Educativa

• Charlas Informativas y Talleres   • Juegos y Actividades Educativas

 

Temas:

 

  • Preparación de Vida y Exploración de Carreras
  • Compromiso Paternal y Participación
  • Ayuda Financiera
  • AB540 e Inmigración
  • Profesiones en Ciencia, Tecnología, Ingeniaria y Matemáticas
  • Servicios de Preparación de Prueba
  • Transición a Enseñanza Superior
  • Vida Diaria en el Colegio
  • Enseñanza y Ayuda Escolar
  • Institutos de Liderazgo Estudiantil y de Padres de Familia
  • Programas de Enriquecimiento y Prevención de Abandono Escolar

 

La feria es gratis y abierta para toda la familia.

La información también se entregará en español.

Personalidades de Telemundo servirán como maestros de ceremonias, asesores de panel y oradores invitados.

Tambien saludarán con apariencias especiales, obviamente sujeto a la disponibilidad.

 


 

El retrato general – factores importantes

 

Con todos los problemas que estamos enfrentando en este país al momento: la economía, el medio ambiente, la política de inmigración, — nosotros, Latinos, podemos agregar otro dilema a nuestra lista. Como comunidad, estamos en medio de una crisis educativa.

 

O sea, mientras que hemos surgido como la minoría más grande (el nuevo censo indica que ahora somos 1 en 6 personas), nuestros niños forman el grupo más grande en muchas de las escuelas (1 en 4), aun:

•Una cantidad significativa (quizás tan alto como el 70%) de niños latinos no tienen acceso al pre-Kinder (o sea los programas pre-escolares).

•Y estando en la escuela, desde el principio, no hay una cierta congruencia entre la escuela y el hogar.

•Luego, asistimos a las escuelas con menos recursos (en todo sentido en terminos de los programas disponibles, los fondos y facultad…);

 

• Contamos o calificamos entre los puntos más bajos en pruebas de logro;

 

•Continúamos tener las tasas más altas del deserción escolar, o sea los alumnos que han abandonado los estudios.

 

•Una tercera parte hasta como la mitad, en general por todo el país, no se gradúan de la “high school” o de la prepa.

 

• el estudiante Latino (promedio) a graduarse de la preparatoria tiene las habilidades de un estudiante del octavo grado. En otras palabras, el estudiante Latino cuando se gradue de la high school, solo tiene el mismo conjunto de habilidades que los blancos tienen en el octavo grado.

 

•Y la mitad de aquellos que si se gradúan de la prepa, (por ejemplo en California), apenas el 25% logran los requisitos para que sean admitidos al colegio o universidad.

 

•Y por lo tanto tenemos las tasas bajas de matriculación universitaria y graduación.

 

• Hubo un aumento este año, pero nos graduamos en gran desproporcion.

 

 

 La educación es un derecho, - no un privilegio.

  

 

Nuestros hijos llevan el peso de esta crisis, y es importante que la resolvamos.

(La educación es el imperativo económico de nuestro tiempo, y del asunto civil de derechos de nuestra generación.)

 

Porque nuestra fuerza competitiva en una economía global depende, y continuará depender en gran parte, en los resultados educativos positivos, de estudiantes latinos, a cada nivel.

 

Y como representamos una porción significativa de la fuerza futura del país, debemos, como comunidad, lograr un cambio dramático y poderoso.

 

Para que podamos crear un futuro positivo se requiere un ciudadano que es, o este:

 

•Equipado para competir en la economía;

 

•Parte de un grupo culto y base de consumo;

 

•Parte de un grupo de talento lingüístico y cultural, que serviría para reforzar enlaces con México y Latinoamérica;

 

•Componente significativo de la fuerza laboral y del negocio, que contribuye al bienestar;

 

•Y equipado para participar y formar parte de la panorama político por el compromiso cívico.

 

 

Debemos mejorar la educación para nuestros hijos, y entre mas rápido, mas pronto habrá este éxito.

 

Es una inversión – como decir, pesos ahora y los dólares más tarde.

 

 

Tareas

A fin de mejorar nuestra posición, debemos abogar para minimizar los cortes a la educación superior, mejorar los índices de graduación, aumentar el número de estudiantes que pueden transferir del “community college” a nuestras universidades, y aumentar la tasa de graduacion de la Universidad.

La ayuda financiera hay esta, pero tenemos que luchar contra las reducciones.  No es “welfare” o asistencia de caridad.  Sino una inversión en el futuro, y hay que protegerla.  En CA, proteger las Cal Grants, en el nivel federal el Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (la concesión suplementaria de oportunidad educativa) así como los programas TRIO; y por supuesto la beca Pell debería estar exenta de reducciónes automáticas.

 

  • Aprender acerca de las historias culturales, los rasgos, los fondos y la diversidad de y entre Latinos
  • Construir programas de educación de maestro que incluyen un componente fuerte de la cultura de estudiante-hogar así que maestros son no sólo simpáticos y sensibles a una cultura diferente pero también apreciativo de los fondos de estudiantes y dispuesto a estructurar la experiencia de la escuela para ser compatible con estudiantes
  • Crear maestros calificados para que han especializado el conocimiento y las habilidades en la adquisición del idioma, capacidad de leer y escribir en dos idiomas, y en aprendizaje transcultural
  •  Investigaciónes en nuetra "recepción social," y el impacto de esto en la eficacia de escuelas y aprendizaje de niños en aulas

 

  • Combatir las vistas de déficit de estudiantes y padres Latinos; y comprender que el alumno, su cultura, y la experiencia de uno no debe chocar con la responsabilidad de maestros y con el conocimiento académico y en particular las habilidades de aprendizaje; y crear relaciones significativas y confiadas con los padres y familias Latinas.

 

 

Theme: Higher Education and Civic Engagement:

 

1) Census projections had underestimated the Latino population growth; New figures show that we are now at 50 million; which is 1 in every 6 persons in the United States.

 

2) Some Latinos can't vote, because they may be undocumented, others because they are legal residents but not yet citizens; and still others because they are still too young; HOWEVER, young Latinos are going to be voting in five to 10 years and are going to be key constituencies; and they are very interested in what's going on. Voz y voto.

 

3) Moreover, as Latino demographics grow, our participation in higher education is not keeping up to pace.

 

4) Higher education institutions are criticized –often for good reason- for their tendency to isolate themselves from their surrounding contexts and for not being more engaged with the issues that affect the communities in which they are located.

5) And the LEAD organization agrees that there are important issues that directly or indirectly affect institutions and their communities that require higher education faculty, staff and students to “get out of the ivory tower,” to do the work that is highly relevant for the local context and to employ findings in such a way that they can be used to foster discussions that help inform policymakers.

 

 

   

Theme: Poverty and Labor

 

1) In the US, minorities are expected to become the majority by midcentury. We will form the bulk of our labor force growth in the next decade.

 

Yet, as Latino demographics grow and Latinos in the labor force grow, our participation in the formal economy is not matching.

 

2) Latinos living in poverty make up about 30% of the US poverty population, in comparison to 16% of the general population. For Latinos, the poverty rate is 25.4 %, compared to 12.5 % for Whites and Asians.

 

Latinos have an unemployment rate of 12 % compared to 8% unemployment for Whites.  Unemployment among Latino youth (both sexes, 16 to 19 years old) is 33 %.

 

And; Latinos continue to have the highest percentage of persons not covered by any health insurance. About 33% of Latinos reported not having health insurance, compared to 12% of Whites.

 

 

Theme: Latinos and Schooling

 

1) Education is the economic imperative of our time, and the civil rights issue of our generation.

2) Latino students disproportionately bear the crux (or burden) of the educational crisis, and is where the greatest improvements and most fundamental changes must be fared.

 

 

Latino Education Pipeline Problem, Pre-K to Graduate School

 

100   Latinos Enter the School System -->


         56   Graduate from HS -->


         27   Enroll in College -->


         10   Earn a BA -->


         2   Earn a Graduate Degree

 

 

  • New Census figures: for American children, we are 1 in 4.

 

  • We need to improve education for Latino children, and unless we do a better job of educating Latino children TODAY, we are putting at risk this country’s economic success TOMORROW.

 

  • Investment – pesos now and dollars later.

 

  • Education is a right, not a privilege.

 

 

 

 

Important Factors

Pre-K: A significant amount (perhaps as high as 70%) of Latino children do not have access to pre-K programs.

High School Graduation: Over 50% of Latino students in general, nationwide, do not graduate from high school.

 

College Readiness (using California as an example):

  • barely 25% of graduating Latino high school students meet college admission requirements in California;
  • barely 6% of Latino high school students are eligible for the UC system and 16% for the CSU system

 

 

College Enrollment:

  • Most Latino high school graduates enroll in the community college system.

 

  • A little more than 20% of CSU-wide student enrollment is Latino; less than 15% of UC-wide student enrollment is Latino.

 

  • Projections suggest that the percentage of eligible Latino students who will enter the CSU and UC system will increase by 50% in the next 10 years.

 

  • Nationally, 6% of bachelor’s degrees are awarded to Latinos; In California; 20% of all CSU-wide graduates are Latino; 13% of all UC graduates are Latino.

 

  

Theme: What do we expect from the LEAD Summit?

 

     The LEAD Summit asks:

 

Are you ready to make a difference in the Latino community?

 

Are you ready to connect with and be part of Latino educational leadership?

 

Are you ready to find cross-sector solutions to improve the education and lives of all students?

 

Raise Your Hand, Step In, and Get Involved!!!

 

Quote from a LEAD Summit participant:  "With nothing more than organizing this event itself, we are already paving the road for our future students not lose the hope of a better future, a future that frees us of the chains of the ignorance.  That road is Education."

 

 

Theme: LEAD Working Toward Solutions

 

The LEAD organization, proposes to take the following steps in order to immediately address the critical educational issues among Latinos:

 

Apply existing technological networks to bring educational and community leaders together at the local, regional, and national levels.

With input from educational and community leaders, create action items to address these critical issues.

Engage educational and community leaders in discussions focused on the critical education issues affecting Latinos.

Publicize success/achievement of action items by participating educational institutions and community organizations.


Proposed steps toward solutions…

 

  • Hold preliminary meetings with local, regional educational and
    community leaders to plan for regional/national conference
  • Publicize the LEAD Conference
  • Announce results of conference
  • Hold follow up meetings with local, regional educational and
    community leaders to assess implementation of action items
  • Report on success of action items

 


 

 

El tema: Retrato general

 

1) La fuerza competitiva de EEUU en una economía global depende, y continuará depender en gran parte, en los resultados educativos positivos de estudiantes latinos a cada nivel. Mientras latinos han surgido como la minoría más grande en EEUU y niños latinos forma el grupo demográfico más grande en muchas de nuestras escuelas públicas, estudiantes latinos:

 

•Asisten las escuelas con menos recursos;

•Continúan tener parte de las tasas más altas de abandono (empujón)

•Cuentan entre el punto más bajo en pruebas de logro;

•Tienen las tasas bajas de matriculación universitaria y graduación.

 

 

2) Como representamos una porción significativa de la fuerza futura del país, nosotros debemos lograr un cambio dramático y poderoso en nuestras comunidades. Para que EEUU pueda crear un futuro positivo se requiere un ciudadano latina que es o este:

 

•Equipado para competir en una economía global;

•Parte de un grupo culto y base de consumo;

•Parte de un grupo de talento lingüístico y cultural, que serviría para reforzar enlaces con México y Latinoamérica;

•Componente significativo de la fuerza laboral y del negocio, que contribuye al bienestar económico de EEUU;

•Equipado para participar y formar parte de la panorama político de EEUU, para votar y por el

compromiso cívico.

  

 

 

El tema: La Educación superior y el Compromiso Cívico:

 

1) Proyecciones del Censo habían menos-estimado el crecimiento demográfico de latinos;  Nuevas figuras muestran que somos ahora mas que 50 millones; que es 1 en cada 6 personas en los Estados Unidos.

 

2) Algunos latinos no pueden votar, porque son indocumentados, otros porque ellos aunque sea residentes legales, todavía no son ciudadanos; y todavía otros porque son demasiado jóvenes; SIN EMBARGO, jóvenes latinos votarán en masa en cinco a 10 años; y estan interesados en lo que pasa. Voz y Voto.

 

3) Además, a como nuestra poblacion crece, desafortunadamente nuestra participación en la educación superior no se mantiene al mismo ritmo o nivel de participacion. O sea no empareja.

 

4) instituciones de educación superior son criticadas –a menudo para razón buena- para su tendencia para aislar a sí mismo de sus contextos circundantes y para no siendo más comprometido con los asuntos que afectan las comunidades en las que son situados.

 

5) Y la organización LEAD concuerda que hay asuntos importantes que afectan indirectamente o directamente instituciones y sus comunidades que requiere facultad de educación superior, el personal y los estudiantes "salir de la torre de marfil," hacer el trabajo que es sumamente pertinente para el contexto local y para emplear conclusiones de tal manera que pueden ser utilizados para fomentar discusiones que ayudan a informar a responsables de formular la política.

 

 

 

El tema: La pobreza y mano de obra

 

1) En EEUU, las minorías son esperadas llegar a ser la mayoría in 40 años. Formaremos el mayoría de nuestro crecimiento de la mano de obra en la próxima década.

 

A como nuestra poblacion vaya creciendo, y a la vez la mano de obra crece, nuestra participación en la economía formal no empareja.

 

2) Latinos que viven en la pobreza son aproximadamente 30% de la población de pobreza de EEUU, con respecto a 16% de la población general. Para Latinos, la tasa de la pobreza es 25,4 %, comparado a 12,5 % para los anglosajones y asiáticos.

 

Los Latinos tienen una tasa del desempleo de 12 % comparado a 8% de desempleo para los blancos. El desempleo entre la juventud latina (ambos sexos, 16 a de 19 años de edad) es 33 %.

Y; Latinos continúan tener el porcentaje más alto de personas sin ningún seguro medico. Aproximadamente 33% de Latinos reportan no tener seguro, comparado a 12%  de anglosajones.

 

El tema: Latinos y Educacion

 

1) La educación es el imperativo económico de nuestro tiempo, y del asunto civil de derechos de nuestra generación.

 

2) Los estudiantes latinos soportan desproporcionadamente el carga de la crisis educativa, y son donde las mejoras más grandes y la mayoría de los cambios fundamentales deben ser idos.

 

 

 

El Problema del Ducto de la Educación entre Latinos,

Pre-Kinder a cursos de posgraduado

 

100   Latinos Entran el Sistema Escolar ->


         56   se Graduan de la HS or prep -->


         27   se Matriculan en el Colegio -->


         10   se Gradúan con una licenciatura -->


         2   se Gradúan con un  Postgrado

 

 

  • El nuevo censo indica; entre niños norteamericanos, nosotros somos 1 en 4.

 

  • Debemos mejorar la educación para los niños latinos, y entre mas rapido hagamos un mejor trabajo de educar a nuestros niños HOY,  el mas pronto habrá este éxito económico del país MAÑANA.

 

  • La inversión – pesos ahora y los dólares más tarde.

 

  • La educación es un derecho, no un privilegio.  

 

 

 

 

Factores importantes

 

Pre-K: Una cantidad significativa (quizás tan alto como 70%) de niños latinos no tiene acceso a programas pre-Kinder.

 

High School Graduation: Más de 50% de estudiantes latinos en general, por todo el país, no se gradúan de la HS o prepa.

 

College Readiness (using California as an example):

  • apenas el 25% de estudiantes Latinos de la prepa logran los requisitos para que sean admitidos al colegio o universidad en California

 

  • apenas el 6% de estudiantes Latinos son eligibles para asistir al sistema de UC y 16% para el sistema de CSU

 

 

College Enrollment:

  • La mayoría de alumnos Latinos de la HS o prepa se matriculan en la sistema community college.

 

  • Un poco más que el 20% de matriculación CSU es de estudiante Latinos; y el menos de 15% de matriculación en el sistema UC.

 

  • Proyecciones sugieren que el porcentaje de estudiantes latinos elegibles para entrarán el CSU y sistema de UC aumentará por el 50% en los próximos 10 años.

 

  • Nacionalmente, 6% de licenciaturas es concedida a los latinos; En California; 20% de todos los graduados CSU son Latinos; 13% de todos los graduados de UC son Latinos.

 

 

 

ENTRE LAS TAREAS para emparejar LAS INCOMPATIBILIDADES ENTRE la ESCUELA Y El Hogar, NOSOTROS NECESITAMOS A:

 

  • Aprender acerca de las historias culturales, los rasgos, los fondos y la diversidad de y entre Latinos

 

  • Construir programas de educación de maestro que incluyen un componente fuerte de la cultura de estudiante-hogar así que maestros son no sólo simpáticos y sensibles a una cultura diferente pero también apreciativo de los fondos de estudiantes y dispuesto a estructurar la experiencia de la escuela para ser compatible con estudiantes

 

  • Crear maestros calificados para que han especializado el conocimiento y las habilidades en la adquisición del idioma, capacidad de leer y escribir en dos idiomas, y en aprendizaje transcultural

 

  •  Investigaciónes en nuetra "recepción social," y el impacto de esto en la eficacia de escuelas y aprendizaje de niños en aulas

 

  • Combatir las vistas de déficit de estudiantes y padres Latinos; y comprender que el alumno, su cultura, y la experiencia de uno no debe chocar con la responsabilidad de maestros y con el conocimiento académico y en particular las habilidades de aprendizaje; y crear relaciones significativas y confiadas con los padres y familias Latinas.

 

 

 

El tema: ¿Qué esperamos nosotros de la conferencia LEAD?

  

 La conferencia LEAD pregunta:

 

¿Estas listo para contribuir al cambio en la comunidad Latina?

 

¿Estas listo para involucrarse y ser parte del liderazgo educacional Latino?

 

¿Estas listo para encontrar soluciones a través de sectores para mejorar la educación y la vida de todos los estudiantes?

 

Levante la Mano, Métase, y Involucrase!

 

Lo que un participante dijo:  "Nada mas con la iniciativa de organizar un evento de esta categoria se estan, ya se va trazando el camino para que muchos futuros estudiantes no pierdan la esperanza de un futuro mejor , un futuro que nos libere de las cadenas de la ignorancia. Ese camino es la Educacion."

 

El tema: LEAD Prepara el terreno para Soluciones

 

LEAD propone tomar los pasos siguientes para dirigir inmediatamente los asuntos educativos críticos entre Latinos

 

Aplicar las redes tecnológicas para reunir educadores y líderes de comunidad juntos en los niveles locales, regionales y nacionales.

Con propuestas de los líderes de comunidad, crear artículos de acción para dirigir estos asuntos críticos.

Comprometer educadores y líderes de comunidad en discusiones que se centran en los asuntos críticos de la educación que afectan a Latinos.

Hacer público el éxito/logro de artículos de acción de las organizaciones participando.


Los pasos propuestos hacia soluciones…

 

  • Tener reuniones preliminares con educadores y líderes de comunidad para planear para la conferencia regional/nacional
  • Hacer Público la Conferencia LEAD
  • Anunciar resultados de conferencia
  • Seguir con los reunions con los líderes, para valorar la implementación de artículos de acción
  • Reportar acerca el éxito de artículos de acción

 

LEAD VIII Audio Invitation Murillo

LEAD VIII Audio Invitation Garcia

 

 

 


 

 

For information, please contact:

Enrique Murillo, an associate professor at Cal State San Bernardino, is editor of the Journal of Latinos and Education.

Enrique G. Murillo, Jr., Ph.D.
(909) 537-5632

fax (909) 537-5992
email: emurillo@csusb.edu

home page: http://www.emurillo.org/